Zane back in decider as coach after Eagles stop Magic

Edgeworth players celebrate a goal against Weston earlier this month. Picture Jonathan Carroll FIVE years after winning a premiership as a player for Edgeworth, Damian Zane has an opportunity to win one in his first season as coach.
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The Eagles survived two late scares to hold on for a scoreless draw against Broadmeadow Magic in the second leg of their Northern NSW National Premier League semi-final at Jack McLaughlan Oval on Saturday.

Both sides finished with 10 men in the stalemate, which followed a 3-3 draw in the opening leg at Magic Park.

Edgeworth progressed to the grand final on the away-goals rule.

Zane had the quick reflexes of keeper Jim Fogarty to thank for sealing a place in the decider.

Magic were awarded a free-kick in injury time and Peter Haynes curled a superb effort which was headed for the top corner of the goal.

But Fogarty moved quickly and got enough on the ball to turn it around the post.

‘‘I aged about 10 years in five minutes,’’ Zane said. ‘‘All I know is it was pretty close.’’

Edgeworth also survived a call for handball against Josh Evans in the penalty area in the 90th minute.

Magic co-coach Bobby Naumov said it was a blatant handball.

‘‘At the end of the day, congratulations to Edgeworth,’’ Naumov said. ‘‘There’s no sour grapes. Human error is part of the game.’’

But he felt yellow cards were dished out too freely for fouls earlier in the match.

Aaron Pritchard will miss the grand final on suspension after copping a second yellow card late in the game. Magic also finished with 10 men after Jon Griffiths picked up a second yellow card midway through the second half.

Naumov said officials should use commonsense in games of high emotion when a grand final place was on the line.

Zane scored in the Eagles’ 4-2 win over Weston in the 2010 grand final, Edgeworth’s last premiership, and he was thrilled to be part of another decider.

‘‘I won’t say I didn’t have expectations at the start of the year,’’ Zane said.

‘‘To make the grand final, and having won the minor premiership and pushing Melbourne City in the FFA Cup … it has been an unbelievable season. Our under22s and under19s are also through to the grand final, which is another amazing effort.’’

Zane had special praise for the Eagles’ commitment, especially in defence.

‘‘Magic only know one way, and that is to go at you,’’ Zane said. ‘‘We are built fairly strong defensively. But obviously we knew a clean sheet would get us through to the grand final.

‘‘Our stoppers, Pat Wheeler, Ayden Brice and Josh Evans, were good against the best strike force in the league.’’

SUNDAY, MAGIC PARK

FIRST GRADE (3pm)

Edgeworth (1) v Olympic (3)

UNDER 22s (1pm)

Edgeworth (1) v Emerging Jets U18s (2)

UNDER 19s (11am)

Magic (2) v Edgeworth (4)

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The Voice Australia 2015: Ellie Drennan becomes youngest winner

The Voice Australia 2015 winner Ellie Drennan (right) with coach Jessie J.As it happened: The Voice Australia 2015 finalThe Voice 2015: RecapHard work pays off for ‘un-stagey’ Voice finalists
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NSW teenager Ellie Drennan has won the fourth season of reality talent series The Voice Australia, becoming the youngest person to do so.

The 16-year-old from the Central Coast walks away with a record deal with Universal Music, $100,000 and a Ford Kuga after beating three other finalists to take home the title on Sunday night. She will release an album of 10 songs on September 11.

Drennan wowed the coaches with a performance of Sinead O’Connor’s Nothing Compares To You during the two-hour finale, as well as a stirring rendition of Beyonce’s Halo with mentor Jessie J.

“I’m over the moon right now,” Drennan said after winning the finale.

“Thank you everyone who voted for me and thank you so much Jessie for always being there for me.”

The Price Tag singer and the teenager became close during the competition, with Drennan referring to Jessie J as her “older sister” in the finale.

Drennan also regularly posted photographs of herself and her coach on Instagram.   LIVE: A message for YOU from The Voice of Australia, @elliedrennanxo! #VoiceFinale#TheVoiceAupic.twitter上海夜网m/qjF8QZa9Mp— The Voice Australia (@TheVoiceAU) August 30, 2015

The reaction to Drennan’s victory was mixed on social media, with many people preferring favourite Joe Moore, 24.

Moore, an established busker who was one of two finalists on Team Madden, was a finalist on Australia’s Got Talent in 2012 and has previously supported artists such as Lionel Richie and John Farnham.

Ricky Martin’s finalist Liam Maihi, 23, was sent packing first, followed by Joel and Benji Madden’s second finalist, NSW Central Coast teenager Nathan Hawes, 17.

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Knights want Maguire to jump ship from Rabbitohs

SOUTH Sydney mentor Michael Maguire has emerged as a genuine contender to coach the Knights next year.
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The Newcastle football committee will begin a series of second interviews with selected candidates this week, amid speculation that an appointment is imminent.

Former St George Illawarra and St Helens coach Nathan Brown is reportedly still favourite but the Newcastle Herald has been told Maguire is in the mix if he is keen.

Maguire, who coached Souths to a drought-breaking premiership last season, is in his fourth year with the Rabbitohs and is contracted until the end of 2017, so he would have to seek and be granted a release from that agreement if he was serious about replacing Rick Stone.

‘‘He is under contract at Souths, but he knows our position if he is interested,’’ a source with knowledge of the interview process said.

The Herald sought comment from Maguire on Sunday, but a Souths club spokesman did not respond to a text message.

Knights chief executive Matt Gidley, who has ruled out caretaker Danny Buderus as a contender for the full-time job, would not comment when asked on Sunday about the Maguire development.

‘‘The club will commence the second-interview process regarding coaches this week. The strongest candidate or candidates will be asked to present to the full board following this,’’ Gidley said.

Newcastle football committee chairman John Quayle sounded out Maguire last month as part of the club’sdue diligence to determine whether the 41-year-old former Melbourne assistant would consider accepting the challenge of rebuilding the Knights.

It is understood discussions with Maguire’s management have been ongoing since then but neither party has indicated whether he is interested in leaving Souths, whose title defence is in tatters after successive blow-out losses to the Broncos (47-12) and Bulldogs (32-18).

Souths (30 points) have slipped to seventh and will be without senior players Issac Luke (suspended) and John Sutton (broken leg) and possibly Greg Inglis (knee) when they play leaders Sydney Roosters (38) at Allianz Stadium on Friday night.

The Rabbitohs were a $9 title chance with TAB上海夜网m.au before their loss to Brisbane on Thursday but have blown out to $21.

Rabbitohs chairman Nick Pappas on Mondaydenied Maguire was set for a move.

To put an end once & for all to a limping dog of a ‘story’: Madge ain’t going nowhere.

— Nick Pappas (@Navlakas) August 31, 2015

The Knights will begin their final week back on the bottom of the ladder after their 20-18 loss to the Bulldogs, and victories by Wests Tigers and Gold Coast.

The Tigers handed the Warriors a second successive 50-16 thrashing at Campbelltown, and the Titans upset the Dragons 28-26 at Robina.

Newcastle are one of four teams on 20 points but their for-and-against points difference of minus 136 is worse than the Raiders (minus 12), Tigers (minus 73) and Panthers (minus 80). The Raiders and Panthers play in Canberra on Monday night.

The Knights play the Panthers at Penrith on Saturday in a game that could leave the loser with the wooden spoon, depending on Penrith’s result against Canberra.

Meanwhile, Gidley anticipated Knights recruit Trent Hodkinson would be fully fit by the time he reports for pre-season training in November.

Hodkinson, who has signed a three-year deal with the Knights, suffered a season-ending dislocated wrist when tackled by Tariq Sims on Saturday.

‘‘I’m not aware of the full details regarding Trent’s injury, but our medical team will assess him when he arrives at the club,’’ Gidley said.

A Bulldogs spokesman said on Sunday that the NSW halfback would require minor surgery and was not expected back during the finals.

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Hayne puts on show of strength for 49ers

Jarryd Hayne was on the bench during most of the Denver game. Picture: Getty ImagesLOS ANGELES: San Francisco 49ers head coach Jim Tomsula would not confirm it, but it appears Jarryd Hayne has played his way on to the NFL team.
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“I don’t want to sit here and make statements and things like that today, but he’s definitely got himself into the conversation,” Tomsula said after Hayne’s latest performance.

Tomsula was sombre after the 49ers gave up a late lead to lose 19-12 to the Peyton Manning-led Denver Broncos in Saturday’s pre-season game.

On Tuesday the 49ers cut their 90-man roster to 75 and in a week Tomsula will settle on the 53-man squad to play the NFL season opener against the Minnesota Vikings on September 14.

Hayne had to sit on the bench for almost three quarters in Denver waiting for a chance, but when it came, the former Parramatta Eel again showed he had the talent, speed and power to play in the NFL.

Tomsula initially looked to his experienced running backs and punt returners Carlos Hyde, Reggie Bush, Kendall Hunter, Bruce Ellington and Mike Davis, against the Broncos, and Hayne was left on the sidelines.

With 3:22 left in the third quarter, the 49ers tossed Hayne on for a punt return.

He did not disappoint. He caught the punt and charged forward for a 12-yard gain before being brought down by the Broncos’ Joe Duncan.

It was not all pleasant for Hayne. A short time after the punt return, Hayne came in as a running back, 49ers’ back-up quarterback Blaine Gabbert offloaded the ball and the rugby league convert ran into Broncos’ strong safety David Bruton for no gain.

A few weeks ago, 49ers special teams co-ordinator Thomas McGaughey jnr said he would know if Hayne was capable of being an NFL player when he saw how he responded to being hit by an opponent in a helmet and pads. Hayne has shown his toughness many times since and just 30 seconds after another Broncos enforcer, 191cm, 145kg nose tackle Darius Kilgo, and two other Broncos hit him for no gain, the Australian jumped up and was ready for more.

Hayne lined up beside Gabbert, put a move on a Broncos linebacker, got open in the centre of the field, caught a short pass from the quarterback and took off.

He split defenders and had just one to beat when he was brought down for an 18-yard gain.

Just as he was a multi-positional player in the NRL, Hayne’s versatility in the NFL by playing running back, on the special teams unit as a punt or kick returner or maybe as a wide receiver, makes him highly valuable.

Tomsula would never admit to a room of reporters that Hayne was a sure thing for the 53-man squad, but he conceded a player who can play on special teams, as well as another position, is a sought-after commodity.

“Obviously special teams value weighs very high when you’re talking about those spots,” he said.

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Sydney property developers Nati Stoliar and James Jariv jailed in US

Villa del Mare, later nicknamed Villa del Night Mare. The Chippendale building that became known as “The Nightmare on Regent Street”. Photo: Supplied
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Nati Stoliar celebrated his birthday in greatly reduced circumstances. Photo: Simon Alekna

Although Sydney property developer Nati Stoliar once resided in the most palatial homes in the nation, on August 19 he celebrated his birthday in greatly reduced circumstances – a jail cell in Nevada.

Earlier this month, Stoliar, 66, who is doing a two-year stretch, was joined by his partner in crime, James Jariv, who received a 10-year sentence over their biodiesel fraud which had netted the pair US$40 million.

Jariv, 64, is one of Sydney’s most reviled developers. In 2004 he fled the country over what has become known as “The Nightmare on Regent Street”.  When purchasers moved into their brand new apartments in Jariv’s development in Regent Street, Chippendale, to their horror they discovered the building was a fire trap and riddled with defects. Jariv had absconded leaving behind debts of more than  $6 million.

In 2009 Jariv and Stoliar, whose own Sydney development company had gone down the tube owing $24 million, set up shop in Vancouver, Canada.

Property development was out and animal fat was in. Their new venture was producing biodiesel fuel from waste fat from animal carcasses. But it was all a sham. There was no farm, no fat and no fuel. The pair fraudulently collected almost US$40 million in trading renewable fuel credits for something which did not exist.

Stoliar’s trajectory from the penthouse to the jailhouse is astonishing  considering he once owned the fabled “Boomerang” in Elizabeth Bay and, in 1996, he paid $8 million for a fine house in Point Piper’s Wolseley Road – the tenth most expensive street in the world.

He bulldozed that house to erect “Ville del Mare” an edifice more befitting his conspicuous wealth. Stoliar craned in an enormous mosaic tile inscribed with an “S” which still graces the entrance of the home.

In early 2001, the well-heeled neighbourhood was evacuated after a parcel bomb was delivered to the house they nicknamed Villa del Night Mare.

The explosive device was contained in a parcel which had a card attached saying, “Timed for destruction”.

“It could be a psycho who did it; nobody knows…You have to be careful when you’re dealing with a psycho,” Stoliar told the Sunday Telegraph at the time.

Villa del Mare, which Stoliar sold in 2004 for $21.5 million, hit the headlines earlier this year when Treasurer Joe Hockey ordered the trophy home be sold after its Chinese purchasers ran foul of foreign investment regulations. It was offloaded for $39 million.

As well as being jailed, Stoliar forfeited US$4 million and agreed to pay a further $1 million in restitution.

The Canadian government recently lost a court case demanding Stoliar also repay it $1 million for defrauding it. The US court ruled the Canadian scam, while similar, was separate to the one Stoliar had perpetrated in the US.

Jariv’s recent sentence for the biofuel scam comes on top of another decade-long prison term. In July Jariv was jailed in Texas for a telemarketing fraud which netted him almost US$7 million.

Jariv’s son Alex, 28, will be sentenced next month over his involvement in both schemes.

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Olympic fight back to reach NPL grand final

Olympic fight back to reach NPL grand final Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Olympic players celebrate their equaliser with their fans. Picture: Peter Stoop
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Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Jaffas Luke Remmington scores a goal and celebrates with a backflip. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Jaffas Luke Remmington scores a goal and celebrates with a backflip. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Olympic players celebrate their equaliser with their fans. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Olympic players celebrate their equaliser with their fans. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Olympic players celebrate their win after extra time. Picture: Peter Stoop

Scenes from the NPL semi-final between Lambton Jaffas and Hamilton Olympic on Sunday. Olympic players celebrate their win after extra time. Picture: Peter Stoop

TweetFacebookCOACH Michael Bolch praised the work of his substitutes, one of whom appears set to miss the grand final, after Hamilton drew 2-2 with Lambton Jaffas in an extra-time thriller to go into the Northern NSW National Premier decider.

Hamilton were down 2-0 on Sunday at Edden Oval and 3-2 behind on aggregate before a 77th-minute header from Pat Brown off an Andrew Swan cross brought the two-leg semi-final to 3-3.

The goal took the game into extra-time, and Olympic continued to pile on the pressure in extra-time before Rhys Cooper ran through onto a Kane Goodchild flick-on and buried his one-on-one chance in the 111th minute to give Hamilton the overall win and a date with minor premiers Edgeworth.

Despite the surprise absence of midfield linchpin Jobe Wheelhouse to an ankle injury, the David Tanchevski-coached Jaffas controlled most of the match.

Goals from Luke Remington (45th minute) and Riley McNaughton (55th) put the defending major premiers in the box seat before Olympic brought on Matt Swan and Jason Korotkich for Ben Koina and an ill Simon Mooney in the 59th minute. In the 73rd minute, the Jaffas lost Jamie Byrnes to a calf injury and the tide turned even more.

‘‘We were 2-0 down, but the boys dug deep and kept going and going,’’ Bolch said.

‘‘[Brad Swancott] made a couple of really good saves for them at the end and I’ll agree with Tanch from last week, they were the better side today – for 70 minutes anyway.

‘‘I thought the subs we put on did really well for us. They changed the game.

‘‘Matt Swan has had a hamstring problem we’ve nursed him through, but he is a quality player to have on the bench.

‘‘Koro did really well, too. He gave us energy in the middle of the park.’’

However, in a blow to Olympic, Matt Swan is set to miss the grand final after securing a new job in Western Australia. He is due to fly out on Thursday.

As well as Wheelhouse, the Jaffas were without Hakan Canli and Kevin Davison.

Tanchevski agreed that the changes late in the game were decisive.

‘‘The first 70 we were really good,’’ Tanchevski said. ‘‘But the changes hurt us. We had two injuries and I had three boys on the bench who were 17 years of age and under22s who had hardly any first-grade time.

‘‘Alex Palozzi was the only regular first-grader there.

‘‘Their subs came on and made a difference for them, whereas we were running a bit thin today. That probably hurt us a bit.’’

However, he was full of praise for teenager defender Michael Williams and former Leeds United star Michael Bridges, who made a rare starting appearance in place of Wheelhouse and set up Remington’s goal with a deft touch.

‘‘Michael Williams had a great game and was our players’ player,’’ he said.

‘‘Bridgey and Jamie Byrnes did well for us and when they came off. That’s when we lost our way a bit.’’

Hamilton play the Eagles in the grand final on Sunday.

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REAL NRL: Wests crush Central to hold top spot for play-offs

REAL NRL: Wests crush Central Action from the Real NRL game Central v Wests on Sunday. Wests celebrate. Photo by Marina Neil
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Action from the Real NRL game Central v Wests on Sunday. Wests celebrate. Photo by Marina Neil

Action from the Real NRL game Central v Wests on Sunday. Wests #12 Matt Herman. Photo by Marina Neil

Action from the Real NRL game Central v Wests on Sunday. Wests #12 Matt Herman tackled by Central #6 Ethan Cook.Photo by Marina Neil

Action from the Real NRL game Central v Wests on Sunday. Wests #9 Chris Knight. Photo by Marina Neil

TweetFacebookWESTERN Suburbs coach Dean Botham asked his players how badly they wanted the Newcastle Rugby League minor premiership.

On Sunday, the Rosellas delivered an emphatic response by beating Central 44-18 at St John Oval to secure a third-straight minor title and the club championship.

Lakes United’s 36-4 win on Saturday over Souths gave the Seagulls a superior for and against, and meant Wests required at least a draw to remain in first place before next weekend’s semi-finals.

‘‘I said, ‘How bad do you want it. Show me your desperation’,’’ Botham said.

‘‘It was about going out and earning some respect today.’’

Wests had been far from convincing over the past month, but they played with more fluency in attack.

Centre Simon Williams opened with two tries and props Ryan Petro and Mark Taufua and winger Ryan Lamb all crossed the chalk for a 26-6 lead at half-time.

‘‘I’m a bit wary of showing too much during the year to our opposition so we did change a few little things and the boys quite liked those changes and they seemed to gel,’’ Botham said.

The attacking flair continued in the second half as Wests piled on tries from Callan Richardson (two) and Matt Herman.

Butcher Boys winger Liam Boney scored off a bomb and prop Jarome Wilson barged over, but the home side never threatened the defending premiers.

Souths’ loss guaranteed Central safe passage through to a second consecutive finals series, so captain-coach Rowan Kelly opted to rest Cruise Wilson, Brett Jarrett, Tim Penny and Matt Baker, who have niggles.

Central face the Goannas at Cessnock Sportsground in the elimination semi-final, which will likely be held on Saturday.

‘‘I’m disappointed we lost, as you don’t want to lose in front of your home fans, but in the end we’ve got to dust ourselves off and prepare for next week,’’ Kelly said.

Not even a 70-minute performance from former international and NSW State of Origin second-rower, Andrew Ryan, and a large Sleapy’s Day crowd could inspire Souths to keep their semi-final hopes live.

Lakes piled on 26 unanswered points in the second half against the Lions.

Ryan started the match, just his third since retiring from Canterbury in 2011, and he was still among Souths’ top performers.

Both sides were scrappy in the opening 40 minutes, before Lakes took control following a Souths mistake off the first set of the second half.

Fullback Jack Mackin scored off a backline move, then prop Tim Harlow and centre Josh Charles crossed for tries within 10 minutes to blow the score out to 24-4.

It was the Lions’ fourth straight loss after they spent the majority of the season in the top four.

Macquarie coach Barrie Moore believes his side are carrying superior form into the semi-finals than in past years after defeating Maitland 42-20 at Maitland Sportsground.

The victory and the Goannas’ 28-20 loss to Kurri Kurri at Cessnock Sportsground allowed the Scorpions to steal third spot and a second shot in the finals.

The Scorpions will play Lakes in the qualifying semi-final at Cahill Oval.

Macquarie have lost six straight semi-final matches since 2012, but Moore believes that is about to change.

‘‘Every year it happens and we worry about this thing about the semis, but we’ve got some good form going at the moment,’’ Moore said.

Halfback Mick Moran was rested due to a shoulder niggle and teenager Travis Edwards was impressive as his replacement.

Cessnock’s pre-finals form has been less convincing. The Goannas have lost five of their past seven games.

Their horror injury toll was further compounded by prop Alec Fata breaking his arm and centre Brendan Williams was heavily concussed.

The Goannas led 20-6 at half-time, but conceded off the second-half kick-off and from there Bulldogs stormed to victory to avoid the wooden spoon.

‘‘I just thought we were poor in the first half, let alone the second half,’’ Cessnock coach Craig Miller said.

‘‘We need to regather really quickly. I just don’t think a performance like that will get us past next week, it was as poor a performance I’ve been a part of.’’

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Legendary trainer Bart Cummings dies

OBITUARY: The King is dead
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JAMES ‘BART’ CUMMINGS

1927-2015

AS the racing industry mourns one of its own, the broader community is also coming to terms with the loss of Bart Cummings who has died aged 87.

While many people can’t name the latest premiership winning trainers, Bart Cummings is etched in Australian folklore because of his association with the Melbourne Cup, known as the race that stops the nation on the first Tuesday in November.

Cummings won 12. To put that in perspective, Lee Freedman has won five and with the influx of international horses now targeting the race, his chances of another seven are remote.

The champion trainer’s family have accepted the NSW government’s offer of a state funeral.

Cummings died in the early hours of Sunday morning and Prime Minister Tony Abbott is among those to acknowledge his passing.

‘‘Australia has lost a sporting giant and a racing legend,’’ Mr Abbott said. ‘‘Few people have dominated a sport like Bart Cummings did.

‘‘Race day will not be the same without him.’’

The Cups aside, Cummings won another 256 group one races, the last two in partnership with his grandson James.

Only the late TJ Smith with 279 won more and along with Cummings and the late CS Hayes, was an inaugural inductee to the Australian Racing Hall of Fame in 2001.

The three were adversaries in a time when racing was a people’s sport and crowds flocked to the tracks. Cummings had already trained eight Cup winners when his stable crashed along with the stock market in 1989.

He had entered into a handshake agreement with a group of financiers to form the Cups King syndicate, and after shelling out $22million on yearlings, Cummings was left with the lot.

With the support of his long-time friend, four-time Melbourne Cup winning owner, Malaysian businessman Dato Tan Chin Nam, he avoided bankruptcy and managed to keep his property, Princes Farm, where he died surrounded by his family.

‘‘He has done more than enough for me in his life. We have had our differences but at the end of the day bygones are bygones. A friend in need is a friend indeed and Bart Cummings is a great mate of mine,’’ Dato Tan said on Sunday.

Cummings was revered by the jockeys who rode for him and those who wished they had, and had the respect of the trainers he competed against.

Glen Boss rode many times for Cummings, most notably on the horse many consider his best, So You Think who did not win a Melbourne Cup.

He did win two Cox Plates, the first in 2009 with Boss aboard.

‘‘You treated him with so much respect because he’s an icon. He’s our Donald Bradman of our sport,’’ Boss said. ‘‘There’s no greater icon that I’ve ever seen. TJ’s up there, but what he has done – you look at his record and scratch your head and you can’t get your brain around what he has actually done.’’

A 20-year-old Blake Shinn rode Cummings’ last Cup winner, Viewed, in 2008 when the Dato Tan-owned horse held off the challenge of Bauer by a nose.

‘‘As a young kid on the big stage – looking back – all you need is confidence to do the job and that’s what he gave me,’’ Shinn said.

‘‘He said ‘son go and enjoy the moment. Put him in a good spot and if he’s good enough he’ll do the job’ and we got the job done.’’

As Cummings health declined, he took a backward step from the day-to-day running of the stable and spent most of his time at Princes Farm on the north-western outskirts of Sydney.

Last Friday marked the 61st wedding anniversary of Cummings and his wife Valmae. AAP

IF a 16-year-old Bart Cummings had taken medical advice to combat the chronic asthma that plagued him, the history of Australian racing would be different and so much poorer.

Cummings was given a simple cure for the chronic condition he had suffered all his life.

“It’s easy, stay away from horses and chaff,” his doctor told him.

It wasn’t easy, it was impossible and Cummings immediately hightailed it back to his father Jim’s stable to feed the horses.

Seven decades and 12 Melbourne Cups later, Cummings is firmly entrenched in Australian folklore as the Cups King. But he was anything but a once-a-year trainer and his record of 268 group-1 victories has only been bettered by the late T.J. Smith with 279.

“I don’t keep records,” Cummings once said. “That may sound strange but I never look back, I only look ahead. You can’t dwell on the past. Racing goes on and you have to go with it.”

So what were his secrets?

The training regime? “A good horse will win the race you train him for,” was the reply.

Is it in the feed? “I like to feed horses as much as they will eat.”

Cummings was famous for his one-liners, his sardonic grin and the sparkle in the eyes beneath a pretty impressive set of eyebrows.

But he never uttered a word without thinking, never smiled without reason and what those twinkling eyes saw set him apart from everyone else.

That Cummings remained in the game as long as he did was testament to his steely determination and resolve to pick himself up after adversity.

“All trainers, no matter how good, go through a battling stage,” he reflected.

“It’s just a matter of having the determination to go on and I hoped the breaks would not be long in coming.” AAP

A great sadness clouds over the Industry with the news of Bart Cummings’ passing.The Cups King’s legacy remembered – past, present & future.

-Gai Waterhouse

So sad to learn of the death of Bart Cummings, legend of the track and giant of the sport.

– Tony Abbott

You’d swear Bart Cummings was part horse with his ability to develop a winner. Was comfortable in a bush pub or with the Queen. #legend #rip

– Kurt Fearnley

Very sad to hear the passing of legendary racehorse trainer Bart Cummings. One of the greats!! #cupsking

– David Warner

Australian sport has lost its grandfather in the passing of Bart Cummings. Genius and legend so easily fit #RIPBart

-Gerard Whateley

Sombre day with the MASTER of our sport sadly passing away. Forever grateful & thanks for the memories JBC #RIPBart

–Blake Shinn

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Animal rights groups lash puppy farm inquiry

A dead dog at a puppy farm in Armidale Photo: Supplied Debra Tranter, the founder of Oscars Law, has slammed the findings of the parliamentary inquiry. Photo: Penny Stephens
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Animal Welfare groups have slammed the NSW parliamentary inquiry into puppy farms, claiming that the committee’s findings only repeat old recommendations and do not go far enough to address dangerous breeding practices.

The joint inquiry into companion animal breeding practices handed down its recommendations on Thursday, after a series of investigations by Fairfax Media and Animal rights group Oscar’s Law uncovered hundreds of dogs at several farms living in “inhumane and abhorrent” conditions.

Chief among the recommendations is a breeder licensing scheme. The NSW government failed to implement the proposal three years ago after it was first put forward by the Companion Animal Task Force.

“I think it’s ironic that recommendation one is just to implement previous recommendations,” said RSPCA NSW chief executive Steve Coleman,  “We made it clear that a lot of this work has been scoped before we just need the government to implement it.”

The investigations revealed puppies from uninhabitable farms were being transported around the country to pet stores and sold on popular trading websites. At one farm a dog had been left inside a dog food bag to rot, while at another a vet report revealed a pregnant female terrier had been left unaided while her intestines had eviscerated.

The breeder licensing scheme would require dog breeders to register their operations and include the licence number with the sale of each puppy. The number would allow the puppy to be traced directly back to the breeder.

The committee’s chair, Northern Tablelands MP Adam Marshall, who has had four puppy farms raided in his electorate in the past year, said the move would empower consumers.

“Why do people buy free range eggs?” he said.  “Because the community is becoming more educated and speaking with their shopping habits, we need to have the strong regulatory system to ensure people don’t buy puppies that are unlicensed.”

While Mr Marshall hopes that consumers will vote with their wallets, Mr Coleman said under current funding arrangements the RSPCA does not have the resources to be able to effectively police rogue puppy farmers throughout the state.

“It’s going to take additional staff and up to eight additional inspectors, which cost up to $120,000 a year each to be able to effectively visit these farms once a year at the very least,” said Mr Coleman.

Mr Marshall acknowledged that resourcing was “the elephant in the room.”

He called on fellow Nationals MP and newly-minted Minister for Primary Industries Niall Blair to take on the committee’s recommendations and recognise that the government had to increase resources to combat puppy farming.

The inquiry also suggested that local council rangers could aid the RSPCA by being granted powers to inspect suspicious farms.

“That is the only major change I noticed,” said Mr Coleman. “Chances are they will know what’s going on and hopefully they will be able to take action.”

The founder of Oscars Law, Debra Tranter, criticised the committee for not recommending a ban on puppies in pet shops, a minimum staff to dog ratio, or a limit on the amount of litters a dog could breed.

“How can a puppy farm with two staff members and 300 dogs who are breeding for up to 10 years produce healthy puppies?,” said Ms Tranter. “We have proved that it is simply not possible.”

The NSW government has until January to respond to the committee’s recommendations.

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Late inclusion Sam Fogarty inspires Merewether win

Late inclusion Fogarty inspires Merewether win Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks
Shanghai night field

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

Scenes from the Merewether Carlton v University NHRU game on Sunday. Picture Brock Perks

TweetFacebookSAM Fogarty was named on the bench, started at outside centre, shifted to inside centre after five minutes, and by full-time had inspired Merewether Carlton to a 27-6 victory over University in the elimination semi-final at No.2 Sportsground on Sunday.

Merewether scored four tries and kept their line intact to qualify for another Newcastle and Hunter Rugby Union sudden-death semi at No.2 on Sunday against The Waratahs, who were beaten 22-19 by Wanderers at No.2 on Saturday.

Fogarty threw the final pass for the first of right winger Sam Rouse’s two tries, and he combined with backline partner Rapine Mason to create a try under the crossbar for left winger Luke Toovey just before half-time to give the Greens a 17-3 lead at the break.

The long-haired centre was equally effective in defence, earning the nod as players’ player.

Greens captain Gareth Ernst was ruled out because of a hand injury he sustained against The Waratahs a fortnight ago.

In the backline reshuffle, Jay Strachan started at halfback, Blake Creighton played fullback and Fogarty ran on as outside centre.

Greens coach Jason Toby had to make another switch after five minutes when inside centre Kent Hatchwell suffered concussion and had to be helped from the field.

‘‘Defensively, Sam led that line-up in midfield and really set the platform for us in defence, so I thought he was our best today along with Patty Ireland on the side of the scrum,’’ Toby said.

‘‘Our defence was one of the big positives out of today, to hold them to no tries.

‘‘We have leaked a few points over the last few weeks, so it was good to have that structure and solidness back in our defence, and the attitude was a lot better in that second half.’’

Toby said Hatchwell would be monitored this week but was unlikely to play on Sunday.

‘‘They’re still assessing Kent now, but he’s had a few head knocks this year, so we’ll have to assess him through the week,’’ he said.

Merewether created several scoring chances in the first half but crossed for only two tries and did not take advantage of the strong southerly at their backs.

Uni, in their first final in five years, began dominating possession early in the second half and cut the deficit to 17-6 in the 49th minute when Jack Rixon kicked his second penalty.

Captain Sam Berry made ground almost every time he touched the ball in broken play, but Uni could not convert possession into points and became frustrated as they chased the game.

Creighton created Rouse’s second try with a well placed chip kick to the corner in the 62nd minute to extend Merewether’s lead to 22-6, then Strachan sealed the deal with a solo scoot to score in the 76th minute.

‘‘It was a bit of a danger game for us because it was their first semi-final in a couple of years and they were always going to be all pumped up for it, too, so it was good to see us weather that storm and play ourselves out of that rut that we were in early on,’’ Toby said.

‘‘We ended up playing some good footy and scoring some good tries, so that was pleasing.

‘‘We weren’t that patient in the first half.

‘‘We had the wind and probably didn’t use that as much as we should have and we squandered some chances, so it came down to patience.’’

Toby said the Greens could not afford to be so reckless against The Waratahs on Sunday.

‘‘They won’t give us many chances and we’ll have to be defensively good because they’re one of the best attacking sides in the comp,’’ he said.

‘‘They throw the ball around and test you quite a bit, so our attitude in defence has to be right.

‘‘And we need to score points – you’ve got to score points to beat Waratah – so it’s all about our execution, and we’ll be concentrating on that this week.’’

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